Nielsen Hayden genealogy

John de Mowbray

Male 1286 - 1322  (35 years)


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  • Name John de Mowbray 
    Born 4 Sep 1286  of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Alternate birth 21 Nov 1286  [6
    Died 23 Mar 1322  York, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Buried Church of the Dominican Friars, York, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Person ID I5330  Ancestry of PNH, TNH, and others | Ancestors of JTS, Ancestor of TNH
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2018 

    Father Roger de Mowbray,   b. Abt 1257, of the Isle of Axholme, Lincolnshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1296  (Age ~ 39 years) 
    Mother Rose de Clare,   b. 17 Aug 1252,   d. Aft 1315  (Age > 64 years) 
    Married Aft 15 Jul 1270  [6, 10, 11, 12
    Family ID F130  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Aline de Brewes,   b. Abt 1290, of Bramber, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 23 Jun 1324  (Age ~ 34 years) 
    Married 1298  Swansea, Glamorganshire, Wales Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 7, 8, 13
    Children 
    +1. John de Mowbray,   b. 29 Nov 1310, Hovingham, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1361, York, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
    Last Modified 4 Nov 2018 
    Family ID F4694  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Summoned to Parliament by writs from 26 Aug 1307 to 15 May 1321.

      Hanged after the Battle of Boroughbridge, in which he sided with Thomas, 2nd Earl Lancaster, against Edward II.

      From the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography:

      In 1311 on the death of Roger Lestrange, the second husband of his paternal grandmother, Maud de Beauchamp (d. 1273), Mowbray was entitled to succeed to her share of the lands of her father William (II) de Beauchamp of Bedford in Bedfordshire (including Bedford Castle), in Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, and Kent. This represented the largest accrual of land since the original grants made to the Mowbrays in 1106. It is somewhat curious that, at some time before Lestrange's death, possibly at the time of Mowbray's marriage, William de Briouze had petitioned the king to allow Mowbray to enfeoff his father-in-law with all the estates that Lestrange was holding by courtesy. In 1316 Mowbray secured a licence to grant the Beauchamp manors of Hawnes, Stotfold, and Willington, Bedfordshire, to Briouze for life and in the first collaborative action with Edward II's favourite, Hugh Despenser the younger, Briouze agreed to allow the king to grant the reversion of Mowbray's manors to Hugh. In the same year Briouze secured a licence to settle his Sussex lands upon John and Alicia, expressly excluding the lordship of Gower from the settlement, possibly because he was considering its sale. Although in June 1322 a royal commission of inquiry stated that Briouze had never given Gower to Mowbray, it does appear that by a special grant, of unknown date, Briouze had given the couple the lordship, with reversion to Humphrey (VII) de Bohun, fourth earl of Hereford.

      Somewhat precipitately, Mowbray entered Gower in 1320 without royal licence, possibly because he had discovered that his father-in-law was proposing to sell the estates; Bohun indeed had paid a deposit on the lordship. Clearly without scruples, at about the same period Briouze was also bargaining with Roger Mortimer of Chirk, Roger Mortimer of Wigmore, and, most dangerous of all, Hugh Despenser the younger. For the latter, as lord of Glamorgan, acquiring neighbouring Gower was an attractive prospect, so he used Mowbray's entry without a licence to persuade the king to seize the lordship. Mowbray argued that as the lordship was a marcher territory where the king's writ did not run, he had had no need of a licence. In this he was supported by the other marcher lords, ever anxious to maintain marcher immunity and by then fearful of Despenser empire building in south Wales. Mowbray's reaction was violent and briefly successful. He ignored the king's order to him and twenty-nine other lords not to assemble and joined in the ravaging of Glamorgan. It was probably on this account that he was accused of the murder of John Iwayn, although later John Fornaux confessed to Iwayn's decapitation. Edward II was forced to give way; Mowbray attended the parliament that condemned the Despensers in July 1321 and on 20 August received a pardon.

  • Sources 
    1. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013., date only.

    2. [S789] The Wallop Family and Their Ancestry, by Vernon James Watney. Oxford, 1928., year only.

    3. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., date only.

    4. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013.

    5. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., date only.

    6. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013.

    7. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008.

    8. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here.

    9. [S76] The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (2004-ongoing).

    10. [S145] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America Before 1700, by Frederick Lewis Weis and Walter Lee Sheppard, Jr. 8th edition, William R. Beall & Kaleen E. Beall, eds. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Company, 2004, 2006, 2008., year only.

    11. [S128] The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdom, Extant, Extinct or Dormant. Full citation details here., year only.

    12. [S1526] The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, Wife of Reverend John Owsley, Generations 1-15, Fourth Preliminary Edition by Ronny O. Bodine and Bro. Thomas Spalding, Jr. 2013., year only.

    13. [S142] Royal Ancestry, by Douglas Richardson. Kimball G. Everingham, ed. 2013., says "aft 29 Nov 1297". Date only.