Nielsen Hayden genealogy

Edward le Despenser

Male 1336 - 1375  (39 years)


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Generation: 1

  1. 1.  Edward le Despenser was born 24 Mar 1336, Essendine, Rutland, England (son of Edward le Despenser and Anne de Ferrers); died 11 Nov 1375, Llanblethian, Glamorgan, Wales; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Baptised: 24 Mar 1336, Essendine, Rutland, England
    • Alternate birth: Abt 24 Mar 1336, Essendine, Rutland, England

    Notes:

    From The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz:

    Accompanied the Prince of Wales into Gascony, Sept 1355, and fought at the battle of Poitiers (France, Hundred Years' War), 17 Sept 1356, at which time he was already a knight. He was with the King in the invasion of France 1359-1360. Made a Knight of the Garter, 1361. Took part in the war in Lombardy, 1368-1372; fought in France, 1372-1373, was Constable of the Army in the Duke of Lancaster's unsuccessful expedition to France 1373-1374, and assisted the Duke of Brittany in his campaign in that province, 1375.

    From Wikipedia:

    He was a friend and patron of Jean Froissart and the eldest brother of Henry le Despenser, Bishop of Norwich.

    There is a statue of him on the top of the Holy Trinity Chantry Chapel in Tewkesbury Abbey, renowned as the "Kneeling Knight."

    Edward le Despenser (1335-1375)
    Elizabeth le Despenser (1365-1408)
    Thomas Arundel (1388-1430)
    Alianor Arundel
    Katherine Browne
    Richard Sackville
    Richard Sackville
    Anne Sackville
    Henry Shelley
    Richard Shelley
    John Shelley
    (Unknown) Shelley
    John Shelley
    Timothy Shelley (b. 1700)
    Byssche Shelley (1731-1815)
    Timothy Shelley (1753-1844)
    Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792-1822)

    Edward married Elizabeth Burghersh Bef 2 Aug 1354. Elizabeth (daughter of Bartholomew de Burghersh and Cecily de Weyland) was born 1342; died 26 Jul 1409; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England. [Group Sheet]

    Children:
    1. Margaret le Despenser died 3 Nov 1415; was buried , Merevale Abbey, Warwickshire, England.
    2. Anne Despenser was born Abt 1363; died 30 Oct 1426.

Generation: 2

  1. 2.  Edward le Despenser was born , of Buckland, Buckinghamshire, England (son of Hugh le Despenser and Eleanor de Clare); died 30 Sep 1342, Morlaix, Brittany, France.

    Notes:

    Slain at the Battle of Morlaix.

    Edward married Anne de Ferrers 20 Apr 1335, Groby in Ratby, Leicestershire, England. Anne (daughter of William de Ferrers and (Unknown) de Segrave) died 8 Aug 1367. [Group Sheet]


  2. 3.  Anne de Ferrers (daughter of William de Ferrers and (Unknown) de Segrave); died 8 Aug 1367.
    Children:
    1. 1. Edward le Despenser was born 24 Mar 1336, Essendine, Rutland, England; died 11 Nov 1375, Llanblethian, Glamorgan, Wales; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.


Generation: 3

  1. 4.  Hugh le Despenser was born , of Loughborough, Leicestershire, England (son of Hugh le Despenser and Isabel de Beauchamp); died 24 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: of Hanley Castle, Worcestershire, England
    • Alternate death: 29 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England

    Notes:

    "The Younger". Favorite of Edward II; ultimately convicted of treason. "Outside the city he was stripped and then reclothed with his arms reversed, and he was crowned with stinging nettles. Condemned to death as a traitor, on 24 November 1326 he was drawn on a hurdle to the gallows, and then hanged from a height of 50 feet. Still alive, he was cut down and eviscerated before finally being beheaded. His head was displayed on London Bridge; his quarters were sent to Bristol, Dover, York, and Newcastle. In December 1330 Eleanor de Clare received royal permission to collect her husband's bones and inter them in Tewkesbury Abbey." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

    Hugh married Eleanor de Clare Aft 14 Jun 1306, Westminster, Middlesex, England. Eleanor (daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre) was born Oct 1292, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died 30 Jun 1337. [Group Sheet]


  2. 5.  Eleanor de Clare was born Oct 1292, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales (daughter of Gilbert de Clare and Joan of Acre); died 30 Jun 1337.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Bef 23 Nov 1292, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales

    Notes:

    "She was imprisoned in the Tower of London, 17 Nov 1326, later released, and had her lands restored to her, 22 Apr 1328. Before 26 Jan 1329 she was abducted from Hanley Castle by Sir William la Zouche who subsequently married her. She was imprisoned again in the Tower, shortly after 5 Feb 1329, and then in Devizes Castle, until after 6 Jan 1330 as a result of accompanying her husband in his siege of her castle of Caerphilly." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    Children:
    1. 2. Edward le Despenser was born , of Buckland, Buckinghamshire, England; died 30 Sep 1342, Morlaix, Brittany, France.
    2. Isabel le Despenser was born Between 1312 and 1313.
    3. Elizabeth le Despenser was born Bef 1328; died 13 Jul 1389; was buried , St. Botolph Aldgate, Middlesex, England.

  3. 6.  William de Ferrers was born 30 Jan 1272, Yoxall, Staffordshire, England (son of William de Ferrers and Anne Durward); died 20 Mar 1325.

    Notes:

    He fought at the battle of Falkirk, 22 Jul 1298, and was present at the siege of Caerlaverock Castle in 1300. He was summoned to Parliament by writs, 29 Dec 1299 to 24 Sep 1324.

    William married (Unknown) de Segrave. (Unknown) (daughter of John de Segrave and Christian de Plessets) died Bef 1316. [Group Sheet]


  4. 7.  (Unknown) de Segrave (daughter of John de Segrave and Christian de Plessets); died Bef 1316.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: Aft 9 Feb 1317

    Notes:

    Possibly named Ellen or Margaret.

    Children:
    1. 3. Anne de Ferrers died 8 Aug 1367.
    2. Henry de Ferrers was born Abt 1303; died 15 Sep 1343, Groby in Ratby, Leicestershire, England; was buried , Ulverscroft Priory, Leicestershire, England.


Generation: 4

  1. 8.  Hugh le Despenser was born 1 Mar 1261, of Loughborough, Leicestershire, England (son of Hugh le Despenser and Aline Basset); died 27 Oct 1326, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: 1 Mar 1261, Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England

    Notes:

    Earl of Winchester. Called "The Elder", despite being the second of three consecutive Hughs Despenser. Fought at Falkirk, at the siege of Caerlaverock, and at Bannockburn.

    "Sir Hugh le Despenser, of Loughborough, Arnesby, Parlington, Ryhall, &c., Wycombe, Compton-Basset and Wootton-Basset, &c., s. and h. [of Sir Hugh le Despenser who d. 4 Aug. 1265], b. 1 Mar. 1260/1. In 28 May 1281 he was given the administration of the lands which his father had forfeited, and had livery of his mother's lands, 8 Aug. 1281, although he was not of age till 1 Mar. following. He had livery of the manor of Martley, co. Worcester, 3 Mar. 1281/2, as h. of his father's first cousin, John le Despenser. He was with the King in Gascony in 1287. Was one of those ordered, 22 Aug. 1288, during the King's absence abroad, to abstain from violations of the peace. Was appointed Constable of Odiham Castle, 12 June 1294. Was appointed an envoy to treat with the King of the Romans, June 1294, with the King of France, 1 Jan. 1295/6, and with the King of France and the King of the Romans, Nov. 1296. He accompanied the King to Scotland in 1296. Was one of the proxies who swore to the treaty with the Count of Flanders, 5 Feb. 1296/7 to 18 Aug. 1307. Received instructions to threaten the Clergy, 21 Mar. 1296/7. One of the King's Council, 1297. Accompanied the King to Flanders in Aug. 1297. He was with the King in Scotland in 1300, 1303, 1304, and 1306. Was appointed an envoy to the Pope, Sep. 1300, to treat of peace with the King of France, 25 Apr. 1302, and an envoy to the Pope, Oct. 1305. In 1305 he was appointed and sworn, in Parl., a commissioner to treat with the Scots. At the Coronation of Edward II, 25 Feb. 1307/8, he was one of the four who carried the table (saccarium) on which were laid the royal robes. Constable of the castles of Devizes and Marlborough, 12 Mar. 1307/8 to 2 Dec. 1308. Constable of the Castle of Strigoil and Keeper of the town of Chepstow, 12 Mar. 1307/8 to 17 July (or 21 Aug.) 1310. Appointed Justice of the forests South of Trent during the King's pleasure, 16 Mar. 1307/8, and for life, 28 Aug. 1309. In the quarrel about Gavastone in 1308 he alone sided with the King against the Barons, who induced the King to promise to dismiss him from Court. He took part in the Baron's letter to the Pope, 6 Aug. 1309. Had licence to crenellate all his dwelling houses throughout the kingdom, 29 Sep. 1311. Keeper of the forests South of Trent, 14 June 1312 to 19 Feb. 1314/5. He was one of the King's deputies in the treaty with the magnates concerning the death of Gavastone, 20 Dec. 1312. Was pardoned for all arrears and debts to the King, 25 Mar. 1313, and accompanied him to Pontoise, 23 May following. He was excluded from the peace that was arranged between the King and the discontented barons in the autumn of 1313. Was at the battle of Bannockburn, 24 June 1314, and accompanied the King in his flight to Dunbar, and thence by sea to Berwick. A few months afterwards the party of the Earl of Lancaster obtained his dismissal from Court, and his removal from the council in Feb. 1314/5. A commission was appointed, 13 July 1315, to hear complaints against his acts of oppression as Keeper of the forests South of Trent. He was in the Scottish Wars in 1317. He was again specially excluded when peace was made with the Earl of Lancaster in Aug. 1318: to avoid the Earl, he is said to have gone "on pilgrimage" to Compostella. Was sent to set in order the affairs of Gascony, 28 Feb. 1319/20, and on missions to the King of France and the Pope in Mar. following. Was appointed Constable of Marlborough Castle, 2 May 1321. He was sum. for Military Service from 14 Mar. (1282/3) 11 Edw. I to 11 May (1322) 15 Edw. II, to attend the King at Shrewsbury, 28 June (1283) 11 Edw. II, to attend the King at Salisbury, 26 Jan. (1296/7) 25 Edw. I, to Councils from 8 Jan. (1308/9) 2 Edw. II to 1 July (1317) 10 Edw. II, and to Parl. from 24 June (1295) 23 Edw. I to 14 Mar. (1321/2) 15 Edw. II, by writs directed Hugoni le Despenser, whereby he is held to have become LORD LE DESPENSER. In May and June 1321 the barons of the Welsh Marches and their adherents ravaged the lands of the younger Despenser in Wales, and those of the elder throughout the country. In Aug. of that year both Despensers were accused in Parl., chiefly on account of the son's misconduct, of many misdeeds, viz., of accroaching to themselves royal power, counselling the King evilly, replacing good ministers by bad ones, &c. Wherefore they were disinherited for ever (19 Aug.), and exiled from the realm, not to return without the assent of the King and Parl. The elder Hugh accordingly retired to the Continent. His lands were taken into the King's hand, 15 Sep. 1321. The sentence on the Despensers was pronounced unlawful at a provincial council of the clergy about 1 Jan. 1321/2. In Mar. following the elder Hugh accompanied the King against the contrariants, and was present at the judgment on the Earl of Lancaster. The proceedings against the Despensers were annulled and cancelled in the Parl. of York, the lands of the elder Hugh being formally restored, 7 May 1322. Three days later, 10 May, the King granted him £20 a year from the issues of co. Hants, to be received nomine et honore comitis Wyntonie, and girded him with the sword as EARL OF WINCHESTER. He accompanied the King in his expedition against the Scots in Aug. 1322. He was appointed Keeper of the forests South of Trent, 27 June 1324, for life. He was sum. for Military Service from 20 Sep. (1322) 16 Edw. II to 1 May (1325) 18 Edw. II, to Councils from 20 Nov. (1323) 17 Edw. II to 20 Feb. (1324/5) 18 Edw. II, and to Parl. from 18 Sep. (1322) 16 Edw. II to 10 Oct. (1325) 19 Edw. II, by writs directed Hugoni le Despenser Comiti Wynton. He m. in or before 1286, without the King's lic. (fine of 2,000 marks, afterwards remitted), Isabel, widow of Sir Patric de Chaurces or Chaworces, of Kidwelly, co. Carmarthen, Somborne, Hants, &c. (who d.s.p.m. shortly before 7 July 1283), and da. of William (de Beauchamp), Earl of Warwick, by Maud, sister and coh. of Sir Richard fitz John, of Shere, Surrey, Fambridge, Essex, &c. [Lord FitzJohn], and 1st da. of Sir John fitz Geoffrey, of Shere and Fambridge. She d. shortly before 30 May 1306. On the King's flight to Wales in Oct. 1326 the Earl was dispatched to defend Bristol, which, however, he at once surrendered on the arrival of the Queen, 26 Oct. Next day he was tried--without being allowed to speak in his own defence--condemned to death as a traitor, and hanged on the common gallows. On his death, 27 Oct. 1326, at the age of 65, all his honours were forfeited, the sentence of 'Exile' passed on him in 1321 being re-affirmed in Parl., 1 Edw. III." [Complete Peerage]

    "When the queen landed in England with an armed force in September 1326, she put out a proclamation against the Despensers. On the king's flight to Wales in October 1326, Earl Hugh was dispatched to defend Bristol, which, however, he at once surrendered on the arrival of the Queen. The next day, 27 October 1326, Sir Hugh le Despenser, Earl of Winchester, was tried -- without being allowed to speak in his own defence -- condemned to death as a traitor, and hanged on the common gallows, all honors forfeited. His head was sent to Winchester." [Douglas Richardson, Royal Ancestry]

    Hanged in his armor, then beheaded and his body cut into pieces for the dogs.

    Hugh married Isabel de Beauchamp Between 10 Sep 1285 and 27 Jan 1287. Isabel (daughter of William de Beauchamp and Maud fitz John) died Bef 30 May 1306. [Group Sheet]


  2. 9.  Isabel de Beauchamp (daughter of William de Beauchamp and Maud fitz John); died Bef 30 May 1306.
    Children:
    1. Philip le Despenser was born , of Parlington, Yorkshire, England; died 24 Sep 1313.
    2. Isabel le Despenser died 4 Dec 1334; was buried , Grey Friars, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.
    3. 4. Hugh le Despenser was born , of Loughborough, Leicestershire, England; died 24 Nov 1326, Hereford, Herefordshire, England; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

  3. 10.  Gilbert de Clare was born 2 Sep 1243, Christchurch, Hampshire, England (son of Richard de Clare and Maud de Lacy); died 7 Dec 1295, Monmouth Castle, Monmouthshire, Wales; was buried , Tewkesbury Abbey, Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, England.

    Notes:

    Called "Red Gilbert" and "The Red Earl". Earl of Gloucester. Earl of Hertford. Steward of St. Edmund's Abbey. Held, among many other manors and lordships, the lordship of Glamorgan, one of the most wealthy holdings in the Welsh Marches. Built Caerphilly Castle.

    A turbulent figure who fought on both sides of the Second Barons' War of 1263-64, first alongside Simon de Montfort at the battle of Lewes (where according to some accounts he personally took Henry III prisoner), and then on the side of the king, commanding one of the royal divisions at the decisive battle of Evesham where de Montfort was killed.

    His subsequent relationships with Henry III and Edward I were complex and fraught. As one of the two or three most powerful non-royal individuals in the realm, he was both a desirable ally and also the very model of the kind of overweening subject that Edward was determined to tame -- and ultimately did.

    As a side note, it is worth noting that while de Clare was still allied to the baronial party, he led the massacre of the Jews at Canterbury, which took place while other rebel leaders were conducting similar massacres in London. Ian Stone writes in "The Rebel Barons of 1264 and the Commune of London," quoted here: "The Dunstable annals report rumours that the Jews of London were preparing to betray the citizens: they had Greek fire to burn the city, copies of the keys to the city gates, and subterranean passages to each gate. Such tales were used to excuse an outbreak of looting and murder. One chronicler says that the Jews were suspected of betraying the barons and citizens, and almost all were killed. Another says that the Jewish quarter was pillaged, and any Jews who were caught were stripped, robbed and murdered. Estimates of the number killed range from 200 to 500, with the remainder forcibly converted or imprisoned (or, looking at it another way, the rest were saved by the justices and the mayor, who sent them to the Tower for protection). The chronicler Wykes, who tended to be less favourable to the baronial party, singled out the baronial leader John fitz John, who was said to have killed the leading Jew, Kok son of Abraham, with his own hands, and seized his treasure. Fitz John was then forced to share the proceeds with Simon de Montfort. It is possible that de Montfort was taking the Jewish treasure, not to enrich himself, but to finance his forces. At the same time, the cash of Italian and French merchants, deposited in religious houses around London, was also seized and taken to the city."

    Gilbert married Joan of Acre May 1290, Westminster Abbey, Westminster, Middlesex, England. Joan (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile, Queen Consort of England) was born 1272, Acre, Palestine; died 23 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England; was buried , Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England. [Group Sheet]


  4. 11.  Joan of Acre was born 1272, Acre, Palestine (daughter of Edward I, King of England and Eleanor of Castile, Queen Consort of England); died 23 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England; was buried , Austin Friars, Clare, Suffolk, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate death: 7 Apr 1307
    • Alternate death: 28 Apr 1307, Clare, Suffolk, England

    Notes:

    Also called Joan of England.

    "The agreement for Joan's marriage to Gilbert de Clare, earl of Hertford and Gloucester, was made in 1283. Gilbert and his first wife, Alice de la Marche, had had only two daughters; this marriage was dissolved in 1285, and a papal dispensation for the marriage to Joan was obtained four years later. Gilbert surrendered all his lands to the king, and they were settled jointly on Gilbert and Joan for their lives, and were then to pass to their children; if however the marriage was childless, the lands were to pass to Joan's children by any later marriage. The wedding took place at Westminster in early May 1290." [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography]

    Because of this agreement, Joan remained in control of the estates following Gilbert's death in 1295. Her father intended for her to marry Amadeus V of Savoy, but instead she secretly married Ralph de Monthermer, a squire of Earl Gilbert's household whom she had previously persuaded her father to knight. "She is reputed to have said 'It is not ignominious or shameful for a great and powerful earl to marry a poor and weak woman; in the reverse case it is neither reprehensible or difficult for a countess to promote a vigorous young man.'" [Oxford Dictionary of National Biography] Her enraged father slapped de Monthermer into prison and seized all of Joan's lands, but through the mediation of Anthony Bek, Bishop of Durham, father and daughter were reconciled and her estates restored to her. Subsequently the king "became much attached to his new son-in-law, who was summoned to Parliament as Earl of Gloucester and Hertford during the minority of his step-son Gilbert de Clare." [Royal Ancestry] De Monthermer went on to serve in a variety of offices and military roles.

    Notes:

    Royal Ancestry gives the date of their marriage as 23 April 1290; Complete Peerage as 30 April; the ODNB as "early May."

    Children:
    1. Margaret de Clare was born Abt 1292, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died 9 Apr 1342; was buried , Queenhithe, London, England.
    2. 5. Eleanor de Clare was born Oct 1292, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died 30 Jun 1337.
    3. Elizabeth de Clare was born Nov 1295, Caerphilly, Glamorgan, Wales; died 4 Nov 1360.

  5. 12.  William de Ferrers was born Abt 1240, of Groby, Leicestershire, England (son of William de Ferrers and Margaret de Quincy); died Bef 20 Dec 1287.

    Notes:

    He was never married to an Anne Despenser, as widely reported in 20th-century secondary sources.

    William married Anne Durward 1270. [Group Sheet]


  6. 13.  Anne Durward (daughter of Alan Durward and Marjory of Scotland).
    Children:
    1. 6. William de Ferrers was born 30 Jan 1272, Yoxall, Staffordshire, England; died 20 Mar 1325.

  7. 14.  John de Segrave was born , of Chacombe, Northamptonshire, England (son of Nicholas de Segrave and Maud de Lucy); died Bef 4 Oct 1325, Aquitaine, France; was buried , Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.

    Other Events:

    • Alternate birth: Abt 1256, of Segrave, Leicestershire, England

    Notes:

    Justice of the Forest beyond Trent; King's Lieutenant (or Keeper) of Scotland.

    "A knight in Aug 1282; served in Wales, 1285, in Ireland, 1287, and in Scotland in 1291 and 1297-1322. He was a principal commander at the victorious battle of Falkirk, 22 July 1298; was at the siege of Caerlaverock, July 1300, being then a knight banneret, and was captured by the Scots following the English defeat at Bannockburn, 24 June 1314 and released following a year of captivity. Appointed Warden of Scotland, 10 Mar 1309 and again, 10 Apr 1310." [The Ancestry of Dorothea Poyntz, citation details below.]

    John married Christian de Plessets 1270. Christian (daughter of Hugh de Plessets) died Aft 8 May 1331. [Group Sheet]


  8. 15.  Christian de Plessets (daughter of Hugh de Plessets); died Aft 8 May 1331.

    Notes:

    Also called de Plescy, de Plessy, de Plessis.

    Children:
    1. 7. (Unknown) de Segrave died Bef 1316.
    2. Stephen de Segrave was born Abt 1285, of West Hatch, Wiltshire, England; died Bef 12 Dec 1325, Aquitaine, France; was buried , Chaucombe Priory, Chaucombe, Northamptonshire, England.